Z390 Power Delivery Specifications & Comparison

Prior to the launch of the new Z390 chipset, we reached out to all of the motherboard vendors to ask what power deliveries each board is equipped with. The setup and capabilities of the power delivery system on a motherboard are becoming an ever popular buying requirement, and manufacturers have taken notice of this. Especially as we have reported in a couple of our reviews now, that some boards are being embellished with claims above and beyond what they can actually support.

As it's been one of the most requested aspects of our Z390 content, we compiled as much information as we currently have in hand. This is what we've been able to pull from manufacturers in terms of specification sheets (directly from source), as well as other board information. In the below table a question mark (?) denotes that we don't currently have this information available. We don't want to speculate on what might be there, but when we get more information we will keep this table updated.

Z390 Power Delivery Comparison
Motherboard Controller H-Side L-Side Chokes Doubler
ASRock Z390 Taichi IR35201
(5+2)
TI 87350D (12)
ON FDPC5939SG (2)
14 IR3598
(6)
ASRock Z390 Taichi Ultimate IR35201
(5+2)
TI 87350D (12)
ON FDPC5939SG (2)
14 IR3598
(6)
ASRock Z390 Phantom Gaming 9 IR35201
(5+2)
TI 87350D (12)
ON FDPC5939SG (2)
14 IR3598
(6)
ASRock Z390 Phantom Gaming 6 UPI9521
(?)
SN Dual N-MOS
(?)
14 ?
(?)
ASRock Z390 Phantom Gaming 4 UPI9521
(?)
(?)
(?)
(?)
(?)
11 ?
(?)
ASRock Z390 Phantom Gaming-ITX/ac ISL69138
(?)
ISL Smart Power Stage
(?)
7 ?
(?)
ASRock Z390 Phantom Gaming SLI/ac UPI9521
(?)
(?)
(?)
(?)
(?)
11 ?
(?)
ASRock Z390M ITX/ac UPI9521
(?)
FC/SN Dual N-MOS
(?)
6 ?
(?)
ASRock Z390 Extreme4 UPI9521
(?)
SN Dual N-MOS
(?)
14 ?
(?)
ASRock Z390 Pro4 UPI9521
(?)
(?)
(?)
(?)
(?)
11 ?
(?)
ASRock Z390M Pro4 ISL95866C
(?)
(?)
(?)
(?)
(?)
11 ?
(?)
GIGABYTE Z390 Aorus Master IR35201
(6+2)
IR3553
(12)
14 IR3599
(6)
GIGABYTE Z390 Aorus Ultra ISL69138
(6+1)
SiC634
(12)
13 ISL6617A
(6)
GIGABYTE Z390 Aorus Pro WiFi ISL69138
(6+1)
SiC634
(12)
13 ISL6617A
(6)
GIGABYTE Z390 Aorus Pro ISL69138
(6+1)
SiC634
(12)
13 ISL6617A
(6)
GIGABYTE Z390 Aorus Elite ISL69138
(6+1)
SiC634
(12)
13 ISL6617A
(6)
GIGABYTE Z390 I Aorus Pro WiFi IR35201
(6+2)
IR3553
(6)
8 -
GIGABYTE Z390 Gaming SLI ISL69138
(5+2)
PPak
(10)
12 ISL6617A
(5)
GIGABYTE Z390 Gaming X ISL69138
(5+2)
PPak
(10)
12 ISL6617A
(5)
GIGABYTE Z390 UD ISL69138
(5+2)
PPak
(10)
12 ISL6617A
(5)
MSI MEG Z390 GODLIKE IR35201
(?)
TDA21462
(16)
18 IR3598
(8)
MSI MEG Z390 ACE IR35201
(6+0)
ON4C929N
(12)
ON4C024N
(12)
12 IR3598
(6)
MSI MPG Z390 Gaming Pro Carbon AC UPI9521
(?)
ON4C929N
(?)
ON4C024N
(?)
10 ?
(?)
MSI MPG Z390 Gaming Pro Carbon UPI9521
(?)
ON4C929N
(12)
ON4C024N
(?)
10 ?
(?)
MSI MPG Z390 Gaming Edge AC UPI9521
(?)
ON4C929N
(?)
ON4C024N
(?)
10 ?
(?)
MSI MPG Z390M Gaming Edge AC UPI9521
(?)
ON4C929N
(?)
ON4C024N
(?)
8 ?
(?)
MSI MPG Z390I Gaming Edge AC UPI9521
(?)
TI87350D
(6)
6 ?
(?)
MSI MPG Z390 Gaming Plus UPI9521
(?)
ON4C929N
(?)
ON4C024N
(?)
8 ?
(?)
MSI MAG Z390 Tomahawk UPI9521
(?)
ON4C929N
(?)
ON4C024N
(?)
8 ?
(?)
MSI MAG Z390M Mortar UPI9521
(?)
ON4C929N
(?)
ON4C024N
(?)
? ?
(?)
MSI Z390-A PRO UPI9521
(?)
SM4337
(?)
SM4503
(?)
8 ?
(?)
Supermicro C9Z390-PGW PXE1610C (6+1)
PXM1310C (3+1)

TDA2132
(?)

9

-
Supermicro C9Z390-CG-IW PXE1520
(5+2)
TDA2132
(?)
7 -
Supermicro C9Z390-CG MP2949A (6)
MP2940A (2)
MP86945 (6)
MP86908 (2)
8 -

As we get more information, we will update the table. We also have some motherboards in for review, so we can go into a deeper analysis on each individual article over the next few months.

The Intel Z390 Chipset, What's New? EVGA Z390 Dark
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  • gavbon - Tuesday, October 9, 2018 - link

    Thank you Hickory, will update now; this information wasn't available to us at the time Reply
  • bill44 - Tuesday, October 9, 2018 - link

    All this boards, but only 1 with Thunderbolt 3. Looks like Thunderbolt 3 is dead (free or not).
    Type C ports and HDMI 2.0 is in short supply too.

    Hopefully next year, we can have two or more USB C (maybe even 3.2), HDMI 2.1, PCIe 4/5 and Thunderbolt 3/4 (Titan Ridge?). Or maybe not, just the same old things hoping for 2020/21.
    Reply
  • DanNeely - Tuesday, October 9, 2018 - link

    There's no licensing fee for TB, the controller chip itself still costs money (IIRC $20 or $30) and still eats 4 PCIe lanes. Worse, IIRC to make the video out feature work they need to be CPU lanes; meaning that adding it means your main GPU slot is an x8, and the secondary one only x4. Reply
  • gavbon - Tuesday, October 9, 2018 - link

    Yeah it's a case of certain vendors opting to dismiss including TB3 ports, which only seems sensible on mini-ITX boards where PCIe lanes aren't too much of an issue. Consumer choice is important though and I'm still glad ASRock has included it; it could be a key buying decision for some! Reply
  • gamingkingx - Friday, October 12, 2018 - link

    Just too bad it is only wired as a x2.. And it is wired into the chipset as far as I am aware, so you are gonna max out your I/Os pretty fast. Reply
  • bill44 - Wednesday, October 10, 2018 - link

    Sure, anything you add will cost something. The are plenty of non-gamers who prefer TB3 vs x16.
    This also highlights how old current PC architecture is. Either we need more PCIe lanes, or faster lanes. Otherwise, all advances will be hindered.

    Up to 6 USB 3.1 Gen 2 ports? You’ be lucky to get 4. Why can’t we have 6 Gen2 ports and the rest Gen1 an no antiquated USB 2.0? PCIe resources.
    All new peripherals use Type C, but this boards generally give you only 1 (saving money on redrivers). USB 3.2 (20 Gbps)? When it comes around, ithis too will need more PCIe lanes. M.2. PCIe 3.0 x4? All lanes are maxed out; the only way forward is faster lanes.

    In the past, Gigabyte was a TB3 champion including the functionality on many of their boards. Now, not a single one.

    Cost saving by motherboard makers? Prioritising gamers? Or simply no demand for TB3.
    The outcome is the same.
    Reply
  • repoman27 - Thursday, October 18, 2018 - link

    Intel merely said that they planned "to make the Thunderbolt protocol specification available to the industry under a nonexclusive, royalty-free license" sometime this year. This hasn't happened yet, and is referring to the protocol spec, not the silicon that Intel produces. If and when they decide to do this, ASMedia or whoever could then begin development of their own Thunderbolt controllers. This means that third-party controllers probably won't appear in shipping products until sometime in 2023.

    As for the currently available Thunderbolt 3 controllers, tray prices range from $6.45 to $9.10. But you also need a USB Type-C and PD controller, power switch, and high-speed mux which runs around $4.59, plus the connector and a few other bits. I don't believe Intel charges a royalty on finished Thunderbolt products, but they do require licensing and certification which are paid for by the OEM and may add significant cost to relatively low-volume products.

    AFAIK, Windows PCs are still required to connect Thunderbolt controllers via the PCH. Apple is the only one using PEG lanes for Thunderbolt, and they don't do that on the 27-inch iMacs where it might adversely impact the GPU.
    Reply
  • Dug - Tuesday, October 9, 2018 - link

    I hope it's not dead. Far more useful than USB C. I would be fine with USB C except there doesn't seem to be a good USB C to USB C hub, which really restricts how many devices you can use. I'm really glad to see it on ASRock itx board so I can attach a portable SSD array. Reply
  • imaheadcase - Wednesday, October 10, 2018 - link

    Tons of monitors of USB-C, anker sells USB-C hubs, I don't think i've seen thunderbolt in a desktop PC to date though. That best part of USB-C is being able to just plug phone into it and copy paste to desktop files (no Microsoft didn't invent that, it was always that way by default in windows) Reply
  • Valantar - Wednesday, October 10, 2018 - link

    TB3 is far from dead, it just has little use in desktop PCs. Have you looked at laptop lineups recently? TB3 is _everywhere_. My workplace (a major university here in Norway) has moved entirely to TB3 docking solutions as they're the only full-featured and universal(-ish) solution.

    eGPUs are useless on desktops. Desktops don't need docks. USB 3.1 is plenty fast for external storage, and if you need faster storage, desktops can fit that internally. The only real use cases for TB3 on a desktop are TB3 networking (for fast direct transfers between PCs) and adding things like extra NVMe or >GbE networking on ITX boards that don't have room for that and a GPU.
    Reply

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