Microsoft showed us IE10 on Windows 8, which honestly has a very iOS-like feel to it. You get smooth scrolling and panning, with a PlayBook style support for tabs. It's amazing how much of the Windows 8 UI looks a lot like RIM's first tablet.

The URL bar is hidden by default but it's actually at the bottom of the screen when revealed. Microsoft has a couple of touchscreen keyboard options, a standard mobile OS keyboard and a split version that lets you type with two thumbs while holding a tablet. 
 
Microsoft also showed that you've got full access to the underlying file system regardless of whether you're in standard Windows mode or the new tile based start screen with lighter weight HTML5 apps.

Overall I'm very impressed with what Microsoft has shown thus far. It's a pretty well done mix of a tablet based UI without giving up the traditional Windows interface.
 
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  • AmdInside - Thursday, June 2, 2011 - link

    Yes, Classic mode will also be included Reply
  • Shadowmaster625 - Thursday, June 2, 2011 - link

    In other words, you can do the same thing with win7 with a "skin" on top. There are a few of these already but they havent taken off because win7 tablets have yet to break below the $400 mark en mass. Reply
  • nafhan - Thursday, June 2, 2011 - link

    ARM hardware support + process node shrinks should help drop the price.

    It'll be interesting to see what software still runs on the ARM versions of Windows.
    Reply
  • yyrkoon - Friday, June 3, 2011 - link

    Possibly for a while, just the bare essentials, and Perhaps any game made by ID soft. Assuming John Carmack or someone else ports their software to windows. Quake 3 is already running on ARM under various *NIX flavors.

    I agree that it will be interesting, but do not see it picking up steam until the numbers look right. I for one will be developing for ARM on Windows. If as nothing else, as a hobby. Personally, I am more interested in the embedded market though. Currently working with GNU toolchains, without an operating system( on the target ), and only a couple of months experience with the platform so far. My experiences so far are pretty good.

    Mainly, I'd like to see what all will be possible with ARM combined with the .NET framework. In the embedded context. Right now, I'm only really seeing a lot of unnecessary overhead . . . we'll see.
    Reply
  • Boopop - Thursday, June 2, 2011 - link

    Surely if something looks similar to QNX on the Playbook, then really it looks like cards on webOS. You know, seeing how RIM completely ripped off the webOS interface =/ Reply
  • DanD85 - Thursday, June 2, 2011 - link

    Yeh, as everything good is a rip off of something else. Everybody just keeping rip off each other. How sad! Reply
  • kerpwnt - Thursday, June 2, 2011 - link

    It's like evolution. Each time software gets ripped off, the "thief" changes it a little. After enough generations of rip-offs, you have software so different from the original that it could be a new species. Reply
  • medi01 - Thursday, June 2, 2011 - link

    Except no matter who ripped off what from what, most of the time it will be Apple who'll get credit for the original idea. Even though it's not their in most cases. Reply
  • darwinosx - Thursday, June 2, 2011 - link

    "It's a pretty well done mix of a tablet based UI without giving up the traditional Windows interface."

    Uh, what> This is the downfall of the whole thing. Microsfot slapped the Windows Phone UI, which has failed in the marketplace, on a tablet with the standard Windows interface underneath. Which doesn't work on a tablet! Its really terrible and great evidence that Microsoft hasn't learned a thing.
    Reply
  • Spivonious - Thursday, June 2, 2011 - link

    WP7 has been out for 8 months and you're declaring it a failure? The Mango update this fall will be a gamechanger. Not to mention that the largest carrier in the U.S. (Verizon) just started offering WP7 phones.

    Give it time.

    Personally, I think MS did a fantastic job with the touch UI in Windows 8. If they can get tablet prices below $400 (and they will by using the ARM platform), they will be a major player.
    Reply

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